Foot and Ankle injuries

Ankle sprain

Ankle sprain refers to ankle ligament injury. A ligament is a short band of tough fibrous tissue which connects bones to other bones. Its main function is to provide stability to the joint by limiting the amount of mobility. Ankle sprain occurs when the foot twists or turns beyond its normal range of movement causing the ligaments to overstretch or tear.

The inner side (medial) of ankle ligament is much stronger, called deltoid ligament. The most frequently injured ankle ligaments are located on the outer side (lateral) of the ankle, these include:

  • Anterior Talofibular Ligament (ATFL)
  • Calcaneofibular Ligament (CFL)
  • Posterior Talofibular Ligament (PTFL)

“High ankle sprains” involve the inferior tibiofibular ligament and syndesmosis. These are the more disabling ankle injuries.

In acute phase, physiotherapy is aimed at reducing pain and inflammation. At a later stage, individualized exercise program targeting muscle strength, flexibility, joint range of motion and balance is warranted to restore normal function and to prevent reoccurrence. At MoveFree Physio, we provide Sport Specific Rehabilitation for athletes to return back to sport with optimal performance.

Achilles Tendonitis

Achilles tendonitis is an inflammatory condition of the Achilles tendon, a thick band of tissue along the back of the lower leg that connects the calf muscles to the heel bone. The main function of the Achilles tendon is to transmit force from the calf muscles down to the foot when the person pushes the foot off the ground (in running and jumping) and helps to control the position of the ankle when the foot lands back on the ground. Usually, the injury happens when the demand placed on the tendon is greater than its ability to function. The condition can happen either after a single incident (acute injury) or after repetitive microtrauma (chronic or degenerative injury).

Pain can be present at any point along the tendon (above the heel bone) called midportion Achilles tendonitis or tendinopathy. Pain may also be present at the heel bone where Achilles tendon attaches, known as Insertional Achilles tendonitis or tendinopathy.

In acute phase, physiotherapy is aimed at reducing pain and inflammation. At a later stage, individualized exercise program targeting concentric and eccentric muscle strength, flexibility and pain free tendon loading is warranted to restore normal function. Shock wave therapy is also useful in aiding the recovery. At MoveFree Physio we offer both focused and radial shock wave therapy for Achilles tendinopathy.

We also provide gait and running analysis using a computerized system to identify biomechanical abnormalities in runners which helps to optimize the running techniques and to normalize foot biomechanics.

Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammatory condition of plantar fascia, the most common source of heel pain. Plantar fascia is a thick band of tissue connecting the heel to the ball of the foot which can become inflamed or can tear. These injuries are due to either excessive traction or compression on the plantar fascia. The most common symptom is pain under the heel or at the arch of the foot particularly in the morning or after a period of rest.  When the condition gets worse, the pain might be felt with every step of walking. In more chronic cases, calcification (bone formation) might happen within the plantar fascia or at its insertion into the calcaneus (heel bone), which is known as “Heel Spur”.

Physiotherapy is usually one of the preferred first line of treatments. Initially, the treatment is aimed at reducing pain and inflammation, followed by stretching and strengthening exercises. At MoveFree Physio we offer both focused and radial shock wave therapy, one of the most advanced therapy for plantar fasciitis. If poor foot biomechanics is the contributing factor, we also provide gait and running analysis using a computerized system to optimize the running techniques.